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PROSE @ Roehampton - Dr James Davies / DSM (talk starts at 3"05') - Shared screen with speaker view
hayls
07:57
yep can hear
Marietta Arampatzi
07:59
Yes we can hear
Admin
08:02
sorry ADMIN is me NEIL
M.Salim S.Wangabi
08:15
Yes I can hear
Andrea Williams
08:20
Yep I can hear
Sudarshan R Kottai
09:44
Can you please post the link please
Admin
10:09
https://roehampton-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/85238545523?pwd=ZmtmUVR5aGNaWDkxQ1FQcHNpQk5XUT09Meeting ID: 852 3854 5523
Admin
10:22
passsword :PROSE
Natalia Hirmas
10:42
I'm sorry, missed what that link is for... can anybody mention it again please?
Sudarshan R Kottai
11:39
thanks a lot
hayls
12:24
yes
CAROLINA REMORINI
14:14
thank you for organizing this event!! I am an anthropologist from Argentina. Nice to be here
Sarah Greaves
15:26
Will you email us a copy of the powerpoint ?
James Gilleen
17:23
Welcome all!
James Gilleen
17:25
Follow @PROSE_Roe on Twitter for news and information about future talks: https://twitter.com/PROSE_RoeSee the PROSE website for current and future events, and for recordings and slides of previous sessions (coming soon): https://www.roehampton.ac.uk/psychology/seminar-series/
James Gilleen
20:39
You can also email prose@roehampton.ac.uk to go on the mailing list. (Emails will not be shared beyond this and you will only be contacted for PROSE talk announcements.)
Karen Nolan
31:09
All men?
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
32:23
I don't think so, I think Benedek is Therese Benedek?
Karen Nolan
34:38
OK thank you Manuela
pianoel
35:53
Isn't it also an empirical question to ask whether DSM is so central to clinical practice around the world?
Jay (he/him)
35:58
Are these transcripts in your book, James? They're so vital!
Tom Marshall
36:47
Pianoel, ICD is used in the UK, rather than DSM
Karen Nolan
36:48
Yes they are, I’ve been reading the book - it’s really good, very engaging
Jay (he/him)
37:05
Thanks, Karen
pianoel
37:14
by dsm I also mean ICD...are these taxonomies really driving clinical practice?
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
37:53
DSM / ICD - yes, I guess they're quite dominant in Western settings
Tom Marshall
38:07
Pianoel, in the UK, for medical records I understand ICD is used for coding purposes too
Marion Linska
38:42
in China they use: f.e. CCMD-3, Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders
Edgar J. Ridley
38:55
American Black psychiatrists requested that racism be classified as a mental illness; but were denied on the basis that "racism is a norm of society". Did your research uncover any material regarding same?
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
40:08
so if racism were included in the DSM, ICD or any other, does that then give the patient grounds to do it because it's a mental health problem as opposed to a criminal issue??
Sudarshan R Kottai
40:20
IS the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria more scientific ?
Marion Linska
40:37
is there any relation between american psychiatric System and the health insurance Payments? do they need diagnosis so that the patients get an payment for their treatment?
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
41:08
Marion - yes
Karen Nolan
41:48
I’m losing sound - not sure if it’s my broadband or are others noticing the same?
marie maynard morgan
41:52
I believe the DSM is directly used by insurance companys
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
42:42
I haven't read James' book, does he offer suggestions for alternatives??
Lisa Crafter
44:01
If the DSM is based on so little scientifc research to justify its reliability, is the new Power Threat Meaning Framework a more viable option? ... Is the PTM Framework based on scientific evidence?
pianoel
44:16
The reason I say that I believe the relevance and centrality of DSM/ICD has to be asked as an empirical question is because, as they say, the DSM and the ICD "are Western cultural documents par excellence'
Tom Marshall
44:26
Question for Dr Davies - at the beginning of your talk you mentioned that the biomedical model is overshadowing psychiatry. If DSM is based on minimal consensus rather than extensive research, how do you square the circle between opinion and robust (biomedical) research?
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
44:32
why is it assumed mental health only has a biological basis
James Gilleen
45:14
PROSE talk, 22nd Jan: Lucy Johnstone”Title: The Power Threat Meaning Framework: A conceptual alternative to psychiatric diagnosis!
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
45:28
for any discipline, isn't clinical evidence the starting point, I'm assuming that over time, what's in / out of the DSM changes as experience progresses and research takes place per disorder?
Edgar J. Ridley
46:01
Including racism in the DSM provides the appropriate stigma, eliminating denial by those who classify themselves as white
Lisa Crafter
46:38
Thank you James, I'll check out Lucy Johnson's talk.
Marion Linska
47:11
so ethnocentrism is still a great problem in diagnosing ...
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
47:16
I suppose I'm wondering that if racism were in the DSM, then any criminal activity doesn't attract the appropriate legal action as this would be minimised due to it being caused by a mental health problem???
Lisa Crafter
47:19
*Johnstone :)
Karen Nolan
47:36
Question: Quite interested in your chapter on dummy pills and the healing power of belief - the power of the placebo effect, I wonder if this can be a positive and how you think we might harness the power of the mind to heal itself?
Renate Bijlholt
47:54
I´d say so Manuela, the DSM 5 is very different from the DSM 4 and includes very important clinical findings, which drastically changed the diagnostic categories
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
48:07
thanks Renate
Manuela Campbell (Kingston Therapeutic Services)
48:38
I wonder if we have to be careful with terms like "power of mind to heal itself" - I wouldn't suggest to any patient to stop their cancer treatment for example
James Gilleen
49:05
I see some questions above - please if you have any more write them here… thanks!
Sudarshan R Kottai
49:36
Is ICD-10 also ame as DSM-5 interms of diagnostic catergories?
Alexis Hoyland (She/Her)
50:28
Many thanks for this talk, Dr. Davies. Do you have any reflections on how the landscape of psychiatry (in clinical practice or academic theory) may have changed since you first published Cracked in 2013?
Renate Bijlholt
51:01
No the ICD10 is slightly different in its diagnostic categories, but at the core has many simmilarities.
Alexis Hoyland (She/Her)
51:02
(for instance, in relation to developments mentioned in the likes of texts such as Re-Visioning Psychiatry from Kirmayer et al.)
Imogen Bevan
51:03
I'm also interested in the relationship between DSM/ICD commitees
Edgar J. Ridley
51:17
Unfortunately, because of the tendency of whites to mythologize all dialogue, it becomes impossible to come to any sane conclusion.
Yolana Pringle
51:19
Can you comment on the decisions relating to conditions that were termed ‘culture bound syndromes’
Lisa Crafter
51:27
Thanks Manuela, it's interesting to hear the DSM-5 is based on "important clinical evidence" compared to DSM-4 ... how do we know this?
hayls
51:35
whoevers mic is on please urn it off
Igor Holanda
51:37
are these psychologists declaring subjective as a fundamental paradigm of the difference over mental health issues?
Igor Holanda
52:06
as in a barrier over the severity of what is or isn’t a disease
Anette Magnus
52:43
Question: Have the APA ever released any lists of the specific research evidence they have "reviewed" before deciding to include new diagnoses in the main manual or the research appendix? I'm thinking about the DSM-5 specifically. I have tried to contact them about the evidence reviewed for Internet Gaming Disorder, but they won't reply to me...
Chris Tyler
53:39
Thanks James - great talk! Did you/have you interviewed users of the DSM? Do you know how many are aware of the background?
Kirsten L.
54:03
Thank you James, very interesting!
Alexander Kenny
54:04
fascinating and disturbing!
hayls
54:05
That was a really interesting talk, Thanks so much. Guven us lots to think about!
Lena De Klerk
54:09
Thank you, brilliant talk.
Liese Recke
54:09
great presentation. thanks
Renate Bijlholt
54:25
Love to hear more about this concerning the DSM5
rochelle newington
54:35
THAT was shocking but incredible to hear so thank you. I loved your book and hope to hear further from you
Jay (he/him)
54:39
Thank you so much, James. What you have gathered here is a powerful undermining of modern psychiatry.
Karen Nolan
54:47
Really interesting and well researched. Thank you
CAROLINA REMORINI
54:49
Thank you James!! great presetation!!
Ian Cartwright
54:59
I see this is being recorded - were would we be able to view recording again. Ta
Susanne Hart
55:04
Thank you James. That was both fascinating and deeply disconcerting!
Harry
55:36
This was really interesting. Thank you!
Jenny Edwards
57:16
Very interesting thank you. There's a very interesting film called Crazywise that looks at our (western) ways of diagnosing vs those populations who nurture and see the special qualities of certain experiences of people. It's long but very, very interesting
Flora Parragi
57:20
what do you think of the network approach of diagnosing mental disorders?
Jenny Edwards
57:58
Here's a link: https://crazywisefilm.com/
Eleni Kotsira
58:34
DSM-5 appears to be engaging with a longer discussion about cultural determinants of disorders and to clarify that the manual cannot be used as a check list for disorders without further clinical judgement and the appreciation of one's cultural background. Would you say DSM-5 is attempting to 'save' the previous versions and to make them relevant in more global terms?Eleni Kotsira, University of St Andrews
Enric Garcia Torrents
59:01
Extremely interesting presentaton, James. Thank you so much.
Karen Hannan
59:12
How does this link to removing a diagnosis or not? Where is becomes clear that the original diagnosis is not correct?
Cris Skinner
59:56
Thank you James, that was very interesting, we are introducing Casian to very early learning. Also read your book: cracking!
Sudarshan R Kottai
01:00:30
very insightful Talk Davies-Sudarshan from India
Alexis Hoyland (She/Her)
01:00:54
Another question (if that's alright!): What steps can be taken in psychiatric and anthropological research to help guide us in the right direction, what sort of PhD topics would you like to see to take us in that direction?
Harry
01:03:12
Is there any research done on the consequenses - on a societal and individual level - of the over-usage of DSM?
Julie Price
01:03:55
Gosh! I’m going to have to read this book … What a splendid presentation. Thank you so much! It seems to be reminiscent of the position of set theory/category theory in mathematics … membership/relationships … I’m reading Eugenia Cheng’s latest book, ‘x + y A mathematician’s manifesto for rethinking gender’ … this leads me to wonder how you would refer to mental health issues …
Alexis Hoyland (She/Her)
01:06:16
Definitely recommend "Crazy Like Us", by Ethan Watters; great book, influential to the chapter James mentioned
Linda Wilson
01:06:22
I'm interested to know how doctors choose which drug to prescribe for particular disorders listedd in the DSM/ICD
pianoel
01:06:33
also articles by derek summerfield
Natalie Tobert
01:06:42
Cultural Perspectives on Mental Health. Medical Anthropology. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cultural-Perspectives-Mental-Wellbeing-Interpretations/dp/1785920847
M.Salim S.Wangabi
01:08:35
what role does psychotherapy play in these categories of mental illness as compared to psychiatry/Phyno pharmacology?
marie maynard morgan
01:10:33
I’m extremely concerned about psychiatrists giving a diagnosis to a patient and then telling their GP that if they are in private therapy their therapist will not only review but also monitor their clients and not return to the psychiatrist.
Igi Moon
01:10:41
The DSM seems to be creating an underclass of the those deemed the emotionally less able. Clinicians appear to use the DSM as a way of making sure they know the criteria so they don't end up in that underclass. Even worse, we now have the 'neuro'!! psychologists pretending to understand plasticity and the brain. There is a massive investment in psychologists using DSM
hayls
01:10:46
I have to go, but thankyou for such an awesome seminar
Franca Kröning
01:11:00
What do you think of the network approach for diagnosing patients?
susannah
01:11:02
Great talk, thank you!
Katrin Sontag
01:11:06
Thanks you very much, amazing talk!!
Matthew Day
01:11:07
Thank you.
Marietta Arampatzi
01:11:15
Thank you very much! Extremely helpful
sham selvaratnam
01:11:19
such a great talk! thansk
Imogen Bevan
01:11:20
THanks!
Emily Wheeldon
01:11:21
fascinating talk, thank you so much
Jemima Gee
01:11:22
Thanks for a very interesting talk. I will put your book on my Christmas list.
Agnes
01:11:24
Thank you
Doctor Trance (Tamara Turner)
01:11:24
Thanks James!
Alan W
01:11:25
Fascinating. Thanks
Kira
01:11:26
Thank you, this was very fascinating!
Emily Pierini
01:11:29
That was fascinating thank you
Marion Linska
01:11:29
thank you so much for this meeting, thank you James Davies! greetings from Austria
RayB.ONeill@dcu.ie
01:11:29
Thank you so much
Jade Houghton
01:11:30
Thank you!
Sam Thrower
01:11:31
Thanks James, fantastic presentation!